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Tuesday, June 13, 2017

ASPRIN - ANTI FUNGAL and ANTI BIOFILM Support


 I woke yesterday with what I call a yeast headache which is commonly located right above the right eye in the center of the brow. In my continuous research the timing of finding the following study couldn't have been more appropriate.

 I decided to add Aspirin to follow my 400mg dose of Fluconazole. Since it has upset my stomach in the past, I started with half a 325mg dose.

 Some improvement led me to adding in the other half and this worked so well that I have added it to my protocol. These headaches often lasted for up to 3 days.

 What appears beneath the link below are excerpts from the same article which discusses Aspirin, NSAIDS, and their antifungal, antibiofilm activity in detail.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC310207/

Aspirin, one of the oldest and most widely used anti-inflammatory drugs, also dramatically decreases biofilm formation by C. albicans. Moreover, some aspirin concentrations (50 to 200 μM) producing significant levels of antibiofilm activity in vitro fall within the range of those frequently achieved by therapeutic doses of aspirin in humans

Aspirin, whose antifungal properties have been reported previously (9), drastically reduced the viability of planktonic cells

For example, addition of aspirin to relatively mature, 24-h biofilms reduced their metabolic activity at 48 h by over 80%

In a further series of experiments, mature, 48-h biofilms grown in the absence of aspirin were transferred to fresh growth medium containing different concentrations of the drug and incubated for further periods of 5 to 48 h. All of the aspirin concentrations tested (75 μM to 1 mM) significantly inhibited biofilm activity after 16 h (Table ​(Table3).3). After 48 h of additional incubation, biofilm activity was reduced by 20 to 80%. Moreover, physiological concentrations of the drug (75 to 200 μM) reduced biofilm activity by 20 to 80%, suggesting that aspirin could have a significant inhibitory effect on mature biofilms in vivo.

Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has a short half-life in circulating blood (about 20 min) and is rapidly deacetylated to form salicylic acid in vivo (34). Sodium salicylate and related compounds such as aspirin are known to have a variety of effects on microorganisms. Growth of certain bacteria in the presence of salicylate can induce multiple resistance to antibiotics. Paradoxically, it can also reduce resistance to some antibiotics

The activities of antifungal agents can also be affected by salicylate. A combination of fluconazole with either sodium salicylate or ibuprofen results in synergistic activity against C. albicans

Some strains of S. epidermidis secrete mucoid extracellular polymers (polysaccharides, proteins, and teichoic acid) that promote biofilm formation and become important components of the biofilm matrix. Salicylate can inhibit the production of some of these components by as much as 95%

Aspirin and etodolac also significantly reduced the viability of biofilm cells. Indeed, aspirin appears to show an even greater effect on viability than on biofilm formation; presumably, aspirin-treated biofilm cells are largely incapable of cell division but still retain some metabolic activity

Aspirin reduced biofilm formation substantially, as determined by quantitative measurements, but in areas of the catheter disks where biofilms could be observed, large numbers of yeasts and hyphae were present, just as in untreated controls. However, examination of the cells at higher magnification revealed that aspirin-treated fungi had very wrinkled surfaces

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