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Tuesday, June 13, 2017

ASPRIN - ANTI FUNGAL and ANTI BIOFILM Support


 I woke yesterday with what I call a yeast headache which is commonly located right above the right eye in the center of the brow. In my continuous research the timing of finding the following study couldn't have been more appropriate.

 I decided to add Aspirin to follow my 400mg dose of Fluconazole. Since it has upset my stomach in the past, I started with half a 325mg dose.

 Some improvement led me to adding in the other half and this worked so well that I have added it to my protocol. These headaches often lasted for up to 3 days.

 What appears beneath the link below are excerpts from the same article which discusses Aspirin, NSAIDS, and their antifungal, antibiofilm activity in detail.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC310207/

Aspirin, one of the oldest and most widely used anti-inflammatory drugs, also dramatically decreases biofilm formation by C. albicans. Moreover, some aspirin concentrations (50 to 200 μM) producing significant levels of antibiofilm activity in vitro fall within the range of those frequently achieved by therapeutic doses of aspirin in humans

Aspirin, whose antifungal properties have been reported previously (9), drastically reduced the viability of planktonic cells

For example, addition of aspirin to relatively mature, 24-h biofilms reduced their metabolic activity at 48 h by over 80%

In a further series of experiments, mature, 48-h biofilms grown in the absence of aspirin were transferred to fresh growth medium containing different concentrations of the drug and incubated for further periods of 5 to 48 h. All of the aspirin concentrations tested (75 μM to 1 mM) significantly inhibited biofilm activity after 16 h (Table ​(Table3).3). After 48 h of additional incubation, biofilm activity was reduced by 20 to 80%. Moreover, physiological concentrations of the drug (75 to 200 μM) reduced biofilm activity by 20 to 80%, suggesting that aspirin could have a significant inhibitory effect on mature biofilms in vivo.

Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has a short half-life in circulating blood (about 20 min) and is rapidly deacetylated to form salicylic acid in vivo (34). Sodium salicylate and related compounds such as aspirin are known to have a variety of effects on microorganisms. Growth of certain bacteria in the presence of salicylate can induce multiple resistance to antibiotics. Paradoxically, it can also reduce resistance to some antibiotics

The activities of antifungal agents can also be affected by salicylate. A combination of fluconazole with either sodium salicylate or ibuprofen results in synergistic activity against C. albicans

Some strains of S. epidermidis secrete mucoid extracellular polymers (polysaccharides, proteins, and teichoic acid) that promote biofilm formation and become important components of the biofilm matrix. Salicylate can inhibit the production of some of these components by as much as 95%

Aspirin and etodolac also significantly reduced the viability of biofilm cells. Indeed, aspirin appears to show an even greater effect on viability than on biofilm formation; presumably, aspirin-treated biofilm cells are largely incapable of cell division but still retain some metabolic activity

Aspirin reduced biofilm formation substantially, as determined by quantitative measurements, but in areas of the catheter disks where biofilms could be observed, large numbers of yeasts and hyphae were present, just as in untreated controls. However, examination of the cells at higher magnification revealed that aspirin-treated fungi had very wrinkled surfaces

Sunday, June 11, 2017

Submitting Specimens to CDC for Diagnostic Assistance

DPDx is a Web site developed and maintained by CDC's Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (DPDM) that uses the Internet to assist laboratorians and pathologists in the diagnosis of parasitic diseases, both in the United States and abroad.


TRAINING RESOURCES - LEARN HOW HERE:

https://www.cdc.gov/laboratory/specimen-submission/training.html

PLEASE NOTE: Effective immediately, the DPDx Team will require a CDC 50.34 submission form to be filled out and submitted with images for diagnostic assistance in order to generate a formal, written laboratory report.  This form must be submitted in a secure method to protect patient information. 

The CDC has a Sharefile system that should be used to submit the form and images.  Please email the DPDx Team to request a one-time link to the Sharefile server to submit a case for diagnostic assistance. 

The Team will include a CDC CSID number for the case in the subject line when they email the link and that number will be used for any subsequent correspondence (when necessary). The following steps describe the submission process:
  • Send an email requesting diagnostic assistance to dpdx@cdc.gov.  DO NOT include patient identifiers or images in the email requesting diagnostic assistance.
  • The DPDx team will respond by email with a CDC Sharefile link, open this link in your browser.
  • Upload your case images and CDC 50.34 submission form.  Other supporting documents and communications such as questions, etc. can also be uploaded as word or text files.
  • The DPDx team will receive notification once the files are uploaded and will respond via email with a preliminary diagnosis using the CDC CSID number assigned. 
  • An official, final diagnosis will be generated only if the CDC 50.34 is submitted.
If the electronic communication system of your institution is incompatible with using the web-based CDC Sharefile, the form should be printed and faxed to (country code +1) 404-718-4195, attn: DPDx Team, or submitted using your institution’s own web-based secure file sharing system, unless the CDC IT Security Team detects that it does not meet HHS requirements for patient data transfer. The images may be submitted by email; however the file name of the images should not include patient identifiers.

To access the most recent form (CDC 50.34), please click here.
This assistance is free of charge (except for U.S. Federal agencies and the U.S. military). If you have an urgent case, please do not delay case management and treatment.

 Please do not include patient identifiers (P.I.) in email inquiries.
Please send your diagnostic request to dpdx@cdc.gov.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Oral Spirochete Bacteria must be dealt with

The following statements are collections from around the internet in dealing with Oral Spirochete bacteria and novel ways of dealing with implant infection. It is believed by some that this is the origin point of Lyme Disease as well as source of relapse.

The author believes this is at minimum a source of Lyme disease relapse potential and must be dealt with. I am open to suggestion on additional methods verified or not in the comments, so please follow, comment. and subscribe. 

None of these statements have been verified and do not necessarily reflect my opinion. Not intended to treat or cure any disease. Some statements offer differing opinion and may conflict. Some deletions and elaborations in parenthesis have been made where the author disagrees with the opinion expressed (albeit of minor importance to the message).

So why put this information here? The importance of attention and research into this area is paramount.

Also implants and root canals cause artificial areas which are not directly connected to the blood supply, therefore antibiotics and other ingested treatments cannot reach into these gaps.

An alternate possible way to treat infected implants is by using a current as outlined here:

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0016157&fullSite  



Video description:

"A diseased mouth infected with spirochetes. 90% of our patients are infected with these creatures which are able to do remarkable things.

Lyme disease and syphilis both very debilitating illnesses are cause by a spirochete.

Why had dentistry chosen to think of the sulcus as a unique habitat somehow divorced from the body?

These spirochetes are microscopically indistinguishable from syphilis or Lyme disease spirochetes. Oral spirochetes have been found in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.

We believe that oral spirochetes are the primary injurious agent in two other chronic diseases that plague man, heart disease and diabetes.

These things breed by the trillions in the gingival sulcus and invade into the body by millions moving via the de-epitheliazed gingival sulcus into the blood stream then into cells found along the blood stream. Primarily the endothelial cells lining blood vessels, and the Islets of langerhans cells in the pancreas.

We have not seen anyone with heart disease or diabetes who are not infected with oral spirochetes. Recent papers have proven the Alzheimer's plaques are created by these spirochetes which breed in the crevice between the tooth and the gum and under plaque bacteria.

The use of tooth cleaning agents will not remove these spirochetes. The only effective methods we have found is Dakins solution. Vigorous rinses for at least two minutes with Dakins or Dakins in a WaterPic®.

The use of the Dakins which is a 20:1 dilution of Clorox bleach is by far the most effective technique for killing spirochetes in between the teeth as well as the more accessible areas.

Brushing and flossing is not enough. Spirochetes form spores which require daily disinfection of the crevice between the tooth and gum.

One thing which will dissolve plaque(the vegetative bacteria which cause tooth decay) off a tooth surface without friction is Clorox diluted in water at a 20:1 water/Clorox ratio.

This material is cheap effective and absolutely works but no one can sell it to you for a high price, so not one cent of marketing money will be spent to educate the public!

This is tragic in the extreme. We have research grade microscopes to show the spirochetes.

The only effective techniques involve using bactericidal materials such as Clorox and high concentrations of baking soda... Other things such as hydrogen peroxide, povidone iodine, chlorhexidiene, and table salt have drawbacks in daily use.

 Tooth pastes are valuable in stopping and treating tooth decay (I recommend glycerin free toothpaste with no Fluoride such as Earthpaste as well as frequent Xylitol use), but flossing and brushing with tooth paste or oral rinses with items such as OTC mouth washes, will not guarantee a kill, and in comparison to Clorox are very expensive over a lifetime.

Patients wonder if Clorox is toxic. While it tastes terrible, it is harmless when diluted to 0.3 percent, that is a 20:1 dilution of 6% Clorox. Clorox turns into
table salt in the stomach if swallowed (unverified statement). 

There will be some initial stinging of the skin in the mouth when first used! That goes away when the skin heals after a few uses. Use at night before going to bed and do not rinse the mouth after.

If irritation develops move to mornings. Use at night when saliva flow shuts down will keep the material killing for a longer time when not rinsed out..

Finally, we have tried them all and brushing with copious amounts of baking soda forcing it into the gums and in between the teeth one time daily and then using a WaterPic® with the dilute Clorox solution will give the best results.

What are those results? Absolutely no leakage of the seal where the tooth come out of the skin. The Gum is a specialized tissue designed to seal the skeleton where it come out thru the skin.

The teeth are the only part of the skeleton which is out side the skin... So it cannot heal itself.

Never eating sugar or carbohydrates between meals will assure no tooth decay in those with normal saliva."

http://tinyurl.com/1ososos1

Second Video description:

http://ImplantDentistryOfSanDiego.com - "Spirochete Killer William D Nordquist searches to find a compound to kill oral spirochetes in the plaque in the gingival sulcus (the pocket round teeth) colloidal silver, Betadine (iodine), and discovers 25% bleach solutions were used unsuccessfully.

A surprisingly simple food with a combination of eight natural herbs turned
out to be a potent spirochete killer (unfortunately not detailed in the video.)

The purpose of the search was to find a substance that would kill the spirochetes in gingivitis and periodontitis before a dental cleaning.

This would prevent dangerous bacteremias caused by dentists cleaning. Research has shown that bacteremias cause damage to the blood vessel lining that takes time to return to normal."

A person in another related video mentions: "Good video, I will make a link to this. I advise to take borega-complex it is helping in just 4-6 weeks a whole cure is 12 weeks. In all cases 100% result, not only by own experiences but also shown by the LTT."

http://tinyurl.com/3ososos3

Periodontal Disease and its Relationship to Systemic Disease   - view it here (2hours in detail) for those who wish to gain a greater understanding of the problem:
http://tinyurl.com/4ososos4
 
 Video description:

          " http://lifeguardyourhealth.com implantdentistryofsandiego.com Periodontal Disease and its Relationship to Systemic Disease has recently come to be one of the most important topics in medicine. This video was made for physicians and detists who treat chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases. "


My notes taken:

Samples collected from molar

Spores survive antibiotics, cysts 1 micron

These spirochetes are anaerobes

Vita D may further suppress immune system upon body's conversion. I am experimenting with sunlight.

Oral spirochetes cause bone loss, cause implants to fail, potential to migrate
Chemical irrigation water pick hipocleanse or bleach see Dakins solution.

Debridement and CO2 laser for high populations vaporizes and cauterizes gingival sulcus (GS).

Tip of laser guide will clog and needs to be cleared by an experienced dentist.

Periodontal disease populates epithelial cells (loaded with spirochete) in GS.

Bleeding points and probing cause bacteremias so antibiotics are used. Flagyl and Amoxicillin started 2 weeks before treatment. (I believe Tinidazole is superior to Flagyl).

Brushing and flossing not enough.

How to make Dakins solution. see http://tinyurl.com/2ososos2

Some other possible methods for controlling bacteria in the mouth may be through oil pulling as outlined below. We do not know how oral spirochetes react to said methods.

If you can oil pull with ozonated coconut oil this would be a superior substitution to the method in the link below. Wheat grass has also been used effectively by those who cannot stand the taste of coconut oil. I have used Xylitol to fend off an impending dental infection.

https://theholisticdentist.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/oral-bacteria-and-oil-pulling/